Judith Armatta
Excerpts from Twilight of Impunity

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Destroyed building in Mostar, photo by author Preface:  For nearly three years, I sat in a courtroom in The Hague, observing what was billed as "the trial of the century." Slobodan Milošević was accused of sixty-six counts of war crimes.  Read more ...

B-129 was a courageous woman who testified against her former president: The following is my report of her testimony. Following that is her story of what happened to her after she testified. I sincerely hope other witnesses were not treated so poorly.

“Those young men died for no reason. . . .”

[Excerpted from Chapter 9: War Comes to Bosnia, pp 230-233]. Read more...

Serb Soldiers Resist; Thugs Enlisted:  While the world’s eyes were on Dubrovnik, the Yugoslav Army laid siege to another lovely old Yugoslav city for three months. Vukovar was reduced to rubble, while Dubrovnik was mostly preserved. What happened after the siege ended – a massacre of 264 people captured from the local hospital -- generated additional charges against Milošević.  Read more...

Lest Our Grandchildren Forget:    Two camp survivors testified back to back on 2 and 3 December 2003. Ahmet Zulic described how difficult the experience of testifying is for survivors: “I tried to be as brief as possible and avoid pain as much as possible because you're taking me through the same pain, I have to relive the experience. It is my duty [to testify].” He continued, "I can't be 100% correct because it is very difficult when 10-11 years have elapsed. . . . Because a person who goes through something like this loses his concentration quite quickly and starts trembling. . . .”   Read more ...

My Mama Would Never Know What Happened to Me: B-1401 was a seventeen-year-old refugee when he and his family were caught in the maelstrom of war, ethnic cleansing, and mass executions that became known to the world as "Srebrenica."  Read more...

Death on the Bench: The year 2004 turned out to be intermission in the Milošević trial, though an eventful one. The prosecution completed its case in February. The presiding judge fell ill, resigned, and died in July. A replacement judge was appointed. The Trial Chamber issued its decision that the prosecution had produced enough evidence to support its case, including the charge of genocide.   Read more...

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